Tag Archives: classic games

Only the strong survive in the cut-throat world of… Toys?!

Check out this trailer from the new film Toyland!

Toyland sheds light into the high stakes world of the 22 billion dollar toy industry, where fun and fortune await those who know how to get inside the mind of a child! Director Ken Sons introduces the inventors behind the biggest toys and games in history while following the ups and downs of game designer, Tim Walsh. From prototype to pitch, follow Walsh along his winding road to New York City’s Toy Fair– will his toy light up the imagination of kids everywhere… or never see the light of day? Toyland makes its World Premier at the Sarasota Film Festival, April 11, 2010.

This clip showcases  some of the most beloved, best-known toys that you’re sure to recognize from your own childhood– I can clearly remember my “Slinky graveyard,” an entire box FULL of tangled metal springs I couldn’t bring myself to part with!

What was YOUR favorite toy as a child?

Revisiting the Classics…

Need inspiration to start your spring cleaning?  Here’s a great reason to dust off that old collection of classic board games!

A recent article from KnoxNews takes a look at how classic games like Monopoly and Scrabble can serve as powerful learning aids!  In the hands of a creative teacher (or parent for that matter), a game like Candy Land is transformed into a tool to reinforce number sense, early math, and critical thinking skills!

Monopoly 300x198 Revisiting the Classics...

This teacher uses Monopoly to teach money management skills like budgeting and making informed spending decisions.

This article shares results from a 2007 study by Carnegie Mellon University, in which disadvantaged preschoolers played a simple numeric board game four times for 15-20 minutes at a time over a two-week period.  At the end of the two weeks, researchers found students’ knowledge of math greatly increased in four different areas of number sense!

School Counselor Vicki Hill uses games not only for academic support, but also to build social skills. “I use Candy Land for a self-esteem building activity,” Vicky describes, “If the student gets a double color card, he must tell something good about himself. ”  Similarly, with the game Sorry, “if the student has to send someone back to start, he must say something positive to the player that gets sent back.”

Have ideas for ways to revive an old classic as a learning tool for your children?  Please share!