Tag Archives: self esteem

Games Teach Life Skills During Play Time!

I recently had the pleasure of being introduced to Michele Wong, coFounder of HATCH, the company behind My Plate-Mate. This guard attaches to any standard plate to prevent messy spills at mealtime and promote independent self-feeding… if that isn’t real-life problem solving I don’t know what is, it’s no wonder her family is drawn to ThinkFun games!

Michele and her family are long-time ThinkFun fans, and I’m thrilled to have her as a guest blogger sharing her story!

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Michele Wong 300x200 Games Teach Life Skills During Play Time!

The Wong Family at Play!

Like most families, we seem to always be on the run from one activity to the next.  Our house is filled with constant chatter and movement.  Well, what can you expect in a home with 3 busy kids?  We do have moments of quiet down time.   This is the perfect chance to open up our arsenal of Think Fun Games instead of turning on the TV or Xbox.  Sure, I’m all for relaxing and having fun.  But while my kids are enjoying their game time, I am content knowing that the benefits of Think Fun games reach far beyond just having a good time.

I believe that learning is not merely about memorizing charts and tables in school.  It is also about creative problem solving – applying and modifying what you know to new and changing situations, looking for solutions from different angles.  All Think Fun games stimulate creative problem solving.  In the process they can also strengthen wonderful characteristics such as patience, flexibility, and self-confidence.  These are skills that will not only benefit my children in school today, but they are important life skills that I hope they will embody and carry with them through the years.

Now back to the fun.  As a Mom (family maid, referee, taxi driver, etc) I must comment on the other appreciated perks of Think Fun Games.  I LOVE that each game is housed in its own draw string pouch.  Finish the game, pile in the pieces, cinch up the bag and Voila!  Done!  These pouches also make games easy to pack and travel.  Our games have accompanied us (and saved my sanity) on an 18 hr road trip, camping trips, long airplane rides and even longer hours stranded at the airport.  The games work well played alone, collaboratively with a partner or in team competition form.

Our Family Favorites-

Rush Hour Jr. – A super fun and mentally challenging game that promotes strategy development.   It’s addictive to both children and adults alike.   And let’s face it, everyone wants to help rescue the Ice Cream Man.

Square by Square- A great game to build spatial relationships and pattern matching skills.  This is another hit for players of all ages.  Our family likes to play timed rounds in teams- kids vs. the adults.  It’s funny to watch the parents break out in a sweat as the kids “school” us in this game.

Block by Block- Another great game that promotes spatial awareness in a 3D puzzle format.  This is always popular with children who enjoy building activities.

River Crossing Jr. and Tip Over- Both excellent games that promote visual and spatial awareness as well as strategic planning.

Zingo- This is a favorite game for youngsters that involves matching as well as shape and pattern recognition.  Also promotes identification of site words and letters.   Just the sight of the “Stinky Feet” is enough to crack my kids up.

Keep up the great work Think Fun!  Our family can’t wait to enjoy and be challenged by what you come up with next.

The Wong Family

Revisiting the Classics…

Need inspiration to start your spring cleaning?  Here’s a great reason to dust off that old collection of classic board games!

A recent article from KnoxNews takes a look at how classic games like Monopoly and Scrabble can serve as powerful learning aids!  In the hands of a creative teacher (or parent for that matter), a game like Candy Land is transformed into a tool to reinforce number sense, early math, and critical thinking skills!

Monopoly 300x198 Revisiting the Classics...

This teacher uses Monopoly to teach money management skills like budgeting and making informed spending decisions.

This article shares results from a 2007 study by Carnegie Mellon University, in which disadvantaged preschoolers played a simple numeric board game four times for 15-20 minutes at a time over a two-week period.  At the end of the two weeks, researchers found students’ knowledge of math greatly increased in four different areas of number sense!

School Counselor Vicki Hill uses games not only for academic support, but also to build social skills. “I use Candy Land for a self-esteem building activity,” Vicky describes, “If the student gets a double color card, he must tell something good about himself. ”  Similarly, with the game Sorry, “if the student has to send someone back to start, he must say something positive to the player that gets sent back.”

Have ideas for ways to revive an old classic as a learning tool for your children?  Please share!

The “Right” Way to Praise a Child

In a recent post I shared a study by Psychologist Carol Dweck that revealed the possible negative impact of evaluative praise (“You’re Smart!”) on a child’s willingness to take risks and challenge him/herself.

This article, offered by the University of Minnesota as a resource for families, shares more specific insight on the ways in which broad, Evaluative praise such as “You’re great,” “You’re wonderful” can do more harm than good, creating dependency and insecurity.

Descriptive praise, on the other hand, builds self-esteem and reinforces specific successes, helping children become independent, creative thinkers and doers.  Instead of looking to somebody else for approval, they trust themselves and their own judgment and learn to make corrections based upon their own evaluations.

Effective praise comes in 2 parts:  First, the adult describes a specific contribution or effort the child has made and expresses appreciation.  (“I see you’re ready to go to recess. You picked up your toys, put on your jacket, and got in line.”)  Second, the child, hearing the accomplishment described, draws conclusions based on this specific statement and praises him or herself, (“I know how to plan ahead and be responsible.”)

Parents guide praise The Right Way to Praise a Child

The S'Match Parent's Guide encourages parents to support young players with descriptive praise

Descriptive praise has two parts:

  • Describe what you see and hear.
  • Describe what you feel.

For a mother, telling her son, “You’re so strong” is not as effective in building self-esteem as saying “That was really a heavy load. Thanks for your help.” This boy can then think to himself, “I must be pretty strong.  Mom thought I was a good helper.”  These internal conclusions are much more believable to the child than a parent’s general value judgment.

As a teacher I found it enormously helpful to post language around my room like “I notice…” and “I like the way you…” to prompt me to make these kind of reinforcing, descriptive statements. This type of praise takes more work and may not come as naturally as first, but the benefits to your children and students are worth it!

Have any tips on how to “retrain” the ways in which we praise our children?  Please share!

The Power of Praise… is “smart” a bad word?

baby genius psa The Power of Praise... is smart a bad word?According to a survey conducted by Columbia University, 85 percent of American parents think it’s important to tell their kids that they’re smart.  To a parent looking to help a child reach his/her potential and feel confident, this seems both a natural and a surefire confidence boost.   However, research in the New York public-school system by psychologist Carol Dweck strongly suggests it may be the other way around.  Giving kids the label of “smart” does not prevent them from underperforming. It might actually be causing it.

For the past ten years, Dweck and her team at Columbia (she’s now at Stanford) studied the effect of praise on 400 fifth grade students in a dozen New York schools.

Dweck sent four female research assistants into NY fifth-grade classrooms. Researchers took a child out of the classroom for a nonverbal IQ test consisting of a series of puzzles—puzzles easy enough that all the children would do fairly well. Once the student finished, researchers told each his score, then offered a single line of praise. Randomly divided into groups, some were praised for their intelligence and told, “You must be smart at this.” Others were praised for their effort: “You must have worked really hard.”

Why just a single line of praise? “We wanted to see how sensitive children were,” Dweck explained. “We had a hunch that one line might be enough to see an effect.”

Then the students were given a choice of test for the second round. One choice was a test that would be more difficult than the first, but the researchers told the kids that they’d learn a lot from attempting the puzzles. The other choice, Dweck’s team explained, was an easy test, just like the first.

Of those praised for their effort, 90 percent chose the harder set of puzzles. Of those praised for their intelligence, a majority chose the easy test. The “smart” kids took the cop-out.

In my own classroom, inspired by my Responsive Classroom training,  one strategy I found helpful for delivering “better” praise was to post sentence starters and key phrases on the walls, both as personal reminders and to help students talk to one another in specific, respectful ways.  These phrases encouraged both teachers and classmates to use encouraging, descriptive language when speaking to and praising one another, such as “I like the way you…” or “Show me how you…”  Here’s another teacher’s account of how changing the way in which she and her students spoke to one another changed the dynamic of the classroom in noticeable and powerful ways!
What are some strategies you’ve used or come across to help deliver effective, genuine  praise?

Read more on this study in Po Bronson’s article: The Power (and Peril) of Praising Your Kids